that a couple can easily protect at least half their estate against care costs?

If you transfer your assets away to avoid your care costs that is treated as deliberate deprivation. However  you can transfer you assets to a Trust to avoid paying for someone else’s care costs.

 

Say a couple own a house worth £150,000 and have another £50,000; a total of £200,000. The husband dies first and everything goes to the widow.  She then goes into care and the whole £200,000 is vulnerable for care costs. McClure solicitors can arrange that on the first death half of the house does not pass to the survivor, but is there for their benefit. If and when the survivor goes into care, half the house is protected and if the survivor’s assets are below the tariff income limit then the survivor will get help from the local authority. 

 

Just contact us on 0800 852 1999 or email contactus@mcclure-solicitors.co.uk to arrange a chat with one of our Estate Planning Consultants. 

 

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0800 852 1999

Call our dedicated appointments line today or complete the form provided to arrange your first meeting with McClure. It will cost you nothing and could save you and your loved ones money, time and hassle.

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